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Article written by Alexander Rodriguez, host of On the Rocks with Alexander

You’ve seen Eddie Danger on Jonny McGovern’s Hey Qween, you’ve seen him on The Howard Stern Show, you’ve seen him make appearances around the nation at about every club, drooled over his too hot for TV Instagram, and you probably have watched his porn a few (or many) times. He is sexually fluid, you never know who’s going to make him hard next. He is very vocal about sexual inclusion, gay, straight, male, female, trans, it’s all about the connection for him. He is a renaissance man who has a Masters, is an accomplished poet, published author, and a musician. He could be the perfect boyfriend, the fun bestie, or the best one-night stand you’ve ever had.

With live appearances being canceled and adult studio work being postponed, Eddie has capitalized on the digital arena, becoming a top-earning content creator. We chatted with him about the industry and fucking during COVID.

Content creators have been making bank during COVID. What is the allure from a fan’s perspective, do you think, of private adult content vs studio made content?

Since I have performed in several pornographic films, I find myself disillusioned by the whole design of studio-made porn. I have worked with so many different gay production houses, and although the chemistry with costar varies, the authenticity of the performance isn’t there. There is a lot of direction, set up, and acting that has gone on. The straight studio work I’ve done was always pretty amateur or independent (they still gate-keep crossover performers from entering the realm of professional studio work). Those scenes always have some wacky stories behind them with a lot of moving parts. I take a shine to those for whatever reason.

From a fan’s perspective, I understand that outlets such as Onlyfans or JustForFans (JFF) facilitate insight into the private lives of the performer. Subscribers get to see their favorite performer’s bedroom and what is in it. They get to see who people genuinely enjoy sleeping with. If the performers are in a relationship together, the fan would gain access behind the curtain of their relationship. I understand the value in that access to unfiltered exposure.

Although I would personally feel uncomfortable with that much access, it is a polite way to be able to see that hot bar tender’s nudes without personal solicitation or doing anything nefarious.

Which do you prefer?

I find myself drawn toward independent production companies who are comfortable following the energy of the performers and letting them do their thing. I do not want to be shouted at when I am topping somebody. I want the room silent and to listen to nonverbal cues from my partner so that I can ensure that everything feels good for them. I want my partner to be able to “act” as natural as they possibly can. I have been on several gay porn sets where I was asked to lick the ass of a performer that I did not feel compelled to lick. But, they’re paying and have their own little vision, so I’ll close my eyes and pretend it’s anybody else’s ass.

In terms of distribution, I like to know where the income from the film is going. Early on in my career, I performed for a lot of big companies and I found myself promoted (for free consumption, save for ad revenue) on all sorts of unrelated sites. Even from the top of my involvement in the porn industry, I never wanted to be a porn star, per se. I wanted to do porn, and if other people liked it, they liked it and would come to me for more.

However, those companies would make full videos accessible on tube sites under the title “Latino schoolboy gets a rubdown”. I am Italian/Armenian, but they didn’t care so long as people are keeping those eyeballs glued to the screen. I’m not here to make other people rich. I am here to do business with like-minds who support my development with an agreement for reciprocation. Exclusive contracts always appealed to me but never came my way. Independent companies have used me regularly though. And, we ride the ride of the industry together.

What’s it like filming with a scene partner during COVID?

I admit that my workflow has suffered some stoppage due to my apprehension to work with random people who have not been properly vetted. Most folks don’t even take their Prep medication on a consistent basis anyway, so I do not trust anyone when they tell me that they have remained isolated unless a big studio with a big fat check is overseeing everything.

When I film my stuff for my JFF account, I stick with the same partners that I have been seeing since before January 2020 (hence a lean harder into heterosexual performances). I had a diverse roster of semi-regular partners before isolation. I just stuck with those who were transparent with me from the very start. They became trusted friends and became more involved with my life.

I do a lot of solo work with toys (sent by marketing companies on behalf of toy companies). For the solo videos, I can double dip in content creating as well as spreading the word of whatever company has hired me to promote their product. Double-dipping and spreading are also things we here at Eddie Danger Enterprises offer on our renowned JFF account. *insert howling laughter*

Regarding producing gay content on my JFF, I found that men were generally intolerant of my isolation, and they fell away quickly. My apprehension to hook up with them after they’d taken part in some local orgy was too much for them to handle.

Unfortunately, it has been hard to find men who are local and seem to take this self-isolation thing seriously, still have access to get tested for STIs regularly, while still being willing and able to film. I know it’s a lot to ask, but I have an in-office career that requires my health to be monitored to ensure the safety of my coworkers. I do not want to jeopardize my foundational well-being just to get a short clip of myself with a man who can’t perform all that well to begin with.

What you have learned most about yourself during quarantine?

Oh geez, I have learned an awful lot. I realized that my authenticity is my best quality. I realized that that scary feeling which compels dishonesty is just deeply-embedded shame, programmed within me throughout the course of my life. My pansexual contribution to the LGBTQIA+ community is not a matter of queer folks suffering my heterosexual tendencies at all. Pansexuality, specifically my perspective as a sex worker, is a very valid component within the spectrum of queer voices that just hasn’t found its place yet.

I also learned how to slow down. With all of the madness of balancing a life of touring for nightclub appearances, contributing to special projects, as well as my life performing my role as a nine-to-five office grunt, I found that I often lost touch with my authentic self so that I could lend my attention to networking and character acting. The character is more or less gone now. I still live loud, but I am a lot more cognizant of the butterfly effect my actions cause.

You are very open and honest about your feelings where fans are concerned. What kind of messages bug you the most? What kind of messages make you the happiest?

I believe that the term “fans” is for other people to use. I do not feel like I have “fans. That was the aspect that sparked my initial aversion to joining sites platforms named Onlyfans or JustForFans. I thought it was presumptuous to invite people to pay to be a “fan”. At least, that’s how I saw it back when it first appeared. The implication of the title of the platform doesn’t matter all that much when I see the money rolling in.

The term fanatic has implications that I do not believe are true for my supporters. If you are a fan of porn, you are a porn enthusiast. If you come to me as a porn enthusiast, you’ll only get my real feelings on the industry. Those feelings are not-so-sexy but more theoretical. So, I am not the one to contact if anyone is looking for titillation.

Regarding my supporters, they have to take me for all that I am. I use my platform to showcase good-vibe posts, videos, etc. I play my guitar and do impressions. I make videos discussing the social repercussions of certain porn trends. I run around with puppets and mascot outfits. To fit in with the concept of being a “fan”, you’ve got to take me for all that I am, since I put out so much of my authentic self for public consumption.

Although, I’d like to elaborate:

In my personal life, I am a passive fan of artists in my own way. I do not want to know their political leaning, I quietly support their art to encourage them to make more. I do not want to know the artist in any way beyond affirmation that we are fighting for the happiness and well-being of all people. Unfortunately, in some respects, I sometimes discover that artists I love hold political beliefs that I find to be harmful to the overall wellbeing of the people that I love. I am specifically referring to the more recent issues involving the rock band Journey as well as the curious case of Mr. Ace Frehley (the founding lead guitarist for the rock band KISS). I cannot unlearn the unfortunate reality that these artists are aligned with a movement of hatred and intolerance. I cannot feel the same about the artist. So, I remain ignorant to a lot of my non-LGBTQIA+ artists’ political leanings, but put my own beliefs right out front so nobody has to uncover some unfortunate reality of my own.

When it comes to queer artists (such as Chad Michaels, for example), I hold them on a higher pedestal, but with a similar ignorance to everything regarding their personal lives. I do not require a relationship with Chad. I am not looking to insert myself into the life of the man behind the artist that I admire (in an almost a Goddess-like consideration). I’ll shell out money for merchandise that makes me happy to have around my apartment, and I will admire their work as it is released. That’s what a real fan should do.

Sure, it makes me all excited when an artist that I adore notices me, but I just see that as a sign of approval (as if to say: this artist that you admire in the highest regard has approved of the direction of your art). That’s it. I take note and carry on.

I get annoyed when folks (or rather “fans”) try to insert themselves into my life. My art comes from a very personal and private place. That is where it will always live. So, I can advise folks who admire me and want to take their own art down a similar path that I have taken, but I have nothing to offer to them personally.

I appreciate when folks take the time to write to me with feedback on positive effects that I have had on their own lives and well-being, or correct some misunderstanding that I am under, or even enlighten me on topics I may be ignorant to. I also like it when new talent asks me for advice. My experience can save people from being taken advantage of. I also really enjoy it when folks can relate to my specific interests, and make contributions of their own that further my intellectual development.

You have hooked up with fans. What makes you say yes to meeting up with a fan?

When I am traveling, I almost always hook up with folks who admire my work. Social media has given us a really wonderful outlet to crowdsource information as well as bring us all closer together. I’ll often announce that I will be appearing in a specific city, and the offers will roll in to hang out and do this or that. If I find someone particularly enticing, sure I will have them over to film or whatever. Travel and sex have always been associated for me.

On a more personal level, I will agree to a hook up if the person is confident enough to offer exactly what they have to offer. I hear a lot of foolishness when people hit me up. One specifically: “I know I’m not your type, but…”- this sort of behavior is ultimately aggravating. It happens often. These people do not have the confidence to treat me with respect. They’re hiding behind their unfair assessment that I am a shallow guy. They think that they’re safely paying a compliment, but it is a passive-aggressive maneuver, fishing for validation, an aggressive judgment on my personality and my inclusive nature. They want me to defend myself and say: “No, no… You are hot and I want you!” But, I am not here to do that. I am not here to hold anybody’s hand to help them get laid. If some loser wants to sit around and make judgments based on the way I look or how they assume a successful sex worker ought to be, that is their problem, not mine.

If they paid a $9.99 subscription fee to access my JFF account, they would see that I am not a shallow man in terms of who I hook up with. But, disregarding the publicly-available evidence that I do not judge people on their superficial attributes (within the body of my pornographic work), I maintain a public campaign for every person to feel beautiful, unbound to physical appearance, mental capacity, or physical disability. If a fool decides to whittle me down to a shallow social media influencer, they will never be permitted access into my personal life.

What tips can you give someone in the bedroom if they are shy about exploring a fetish or secret desire?

My advice to everybody is to Just Do It *swoosh*. The creepiest thing you can do is succumb to shame and bury your desires beneath layers of insecurity. You’ll want to partake in these fetish acts and try to trick people into unknowingly scratching that itch for you. It will not be satisfactory and your desires will only begin to consume more of your thoughts. Live your truth (as long as it is not harmful to anyone or inhibits the happiness and wellbeing of others).

We have so many outlets online for people to educate themselves about their specific kinks. We have so many ways for people to connect on shared interests and desires. Be honest. If you are concerned about how the public will perceive your fetish, maybe consider eliminating the folks who are not willing to keep your private life private.

Throughout my loud career, I have been hit up by several people from my upbringing discussing a similar matter (the all-star quarterback of my high school’s football team, a ton of cheerleaders, everybody who was always so polished and correct). They come to me because I am a safe bridge into the world of unabashed human sexuality. Whether they are contacting me over anxiety over a preference for transwomen over women who were assigned female at birth or they seek guidance on handling their HIV status, I facilitate a nonjudgmental safe space and talk them through their personal torment. I keep their secrets and hold my promises.

Unfortunately, the majority of these people fell prey to that oppressive small-town mentality that forces people to disguise themselves, presenting as perfect of a picture they can to their small-minded community. They live in fear of judgment and get themselves deep into family commitments which completely block their personal development. It pains me to see them carry on in their cute little photos with their cute little families, knowing that there is a whole beautiful spirit, sealed away. You can see it in their smiles sometimes.

I’m not over here, jeering over how people turned out in the long run. I’m not that guy. I want everybody to be happy today.

What constitutes a good fuck session?

Well, I usually go for around six hours at a time. I am a lot less insane than I used to be. I used to want everyone I saw. I cared about variety over everything else. I wanted to do it all. But, these days, I schedule a session and take my job seriously. I perform in the best way I can. I’m usually good for about three or four rounds before craving my solitude. It’s like administering a massage, but I enjoy it just as much as the person that I am working with.

I want my legs to feel sore and my genitals used to their capacity. Nobody walks out of my apartment the same after we’re done. I am absolutely attentive to my partners. It is a shared meditation with peaks and valleys. I discover what works, what doesn’t, consider where we can take certain kinks within the spectrum of our relationship, and I maximize the amount of pleasure my partner can experience.

So, I value quality over quantity these days. That’s the short answer.

You come across very sexual on your social media – is that a fair depiction? Are you as sexual in real life as you are in your persona?

Yes. I am extremely sexual. However, I have always experienced sex with other people. I often notice that people don’t really consider their partners when they’re having hookups. I don’t want to waste anybody’s time. I get off when other people are happy to be there. I will never hook up with somebody who is drunk or unable to consent. I take my romance as I take my coffee, honest.

That said, I am honest about everything sexual. I treat sex as if it’s a regular part of life. I hold a master’s degree in feminist literary theory, so I have always operated with the backdrop that gender and sexuality can be theoretical. We can discuss sex without popping boners or giggling.

I am publicly sexual in a manner to normalize open communication over the whole situation and to demystify the sex lives of other people.

Sure, the monster breaks out of me sometimes and I go all primal, but those are not often used as fodder for my social media content creation. I keep the more intimate moments where they belong, in private. Nobody knows anything about who I hook up with off-camera. Social media may get stories about it, but nothing specific, nothing harmful to the people in my life.

What are the biggest misconceptions people have about Eddie Danger?

I am unsure about the way I am perceived by people. Once people realized that I am not easily shaken, the personal critiques stopped rolling in early on in my career.

If I were pressed to answer about what I am uneasy about regarding my relationship with my audience, I’d say that I worry a lot about suffering too much where I don’t belong (racial issues, trans rights, concerns for folks with disabilities). But, I believe I maintain a pretty respectful boundary. I’ll discuss these issues, but I won’t brand myself as a martyr. At least, I hope that is how I come across. I want to be an active voice with the intent to lift other people up, but I would never want to come off as I am pandering for my own benefit. Your audience would be able to provide a better critique than I ever could and I’m open to learning.

Regarding misconceptions on my involvement in queer entertainment, I believe that I garnered a bit of a reputation of being a star fucker. Throughout my career, which is longer than a decade at this point, RuPaul’s Drag Race became such a phenomenon. The stars of the show would be hired at venues where I worked locally, and I got to know them as they took their leisure time visiting male strip clubs. Throughout the years, we’d connect, reconnect, and folks just assumed that I was romantically involved with them.

Drag queens, at least in the past, seemed to want their supporters to know that they were sexual people underneath the make-up and the persona (this was a much-needed point of discussion as drag became more mainstream), so they did not shy away from openly discussing their adventures on the road. So, I guess the assumption that I was hooking up with these people was well-founded.

Sure, I have slept with several entertainers, but without aims of chasing their fame. I have always wanted to be remembered for my contributions to queer art rather than my personal involvement with someone famous.

What kind of scenes do you want to be filming, if any, in ten years?

I’d hopefully still be active. I am performing a very fragile balancing act in my life regarding my professional life in the office, my artistic endeavors, and my conception as a public figure in adult entertainment.

I’d hopefully find a regular partner who enables my personal development but also contributes to my art to make it much more interesting. I’d like to find a romantic partner who can join me on this wacky journey, but that will come in time after I have become the most sensitive, fully-realized man that I can become.

How can the everyday Joe benefit from watching more porn?

I think porn has a legacy of contributing to the ugly parts of people’s subconsciousness. A lot of porn promotes abuse under the guise of fun entertainment. I have been studying bukkake and gokkun films throughout isolation and have noticed a lot of patterns that I find contribute to the disparagement of women and the objectification of their bodies (or overall humanity for that matter).

I’d advise that porn companies be more careful with the marketing of their content. Using categories such as “shemale” or “chicks with dicks” permeates this abusive pattern that trickles down into our waking life and everyday communication.

By no fault of their own, the curious viewers of transgender porn are positioned to utilize abusive language in order to search for their specific tastes. This process normalizes the consideration of trans people as an objectified fetish, similar to our consideration that all porn including men and women of color must be deemed “interracial” and all black men must have that “BBC”.

These terms penetrate the impressionable minds of folks who are privately researching their sexual desires. The quick fix is to eliminate offensive terminology, although I am no expert on search algorithms.

In terms of our progress as an inclusive porn community, AVN has issued a statement that promises to eliminate racially insensitive award classifications during their annual AVN Award Ceremony. So, that’s a nice step in the right direction, especially from the top of the straight porn world. Straight porn does not have a reputation for being the most inclusive genre of entertainment.

You can follow Eddie on Instagram

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